Review – Trail Tech Voyager Pro

Trail Tech Voyager Pro

If you ride motorcycles or ATVs you are doubtless already familiar with Trail Tech and the wide variety of lights, electrical supplies, gauges, navigation units and other aftermarket accessories they design and sell.  Some of you may have used their flagship navigation unit – the Voyager. Despite some limitations the TT Voyager was favored by many riders because of the reams of useful vehicle information it was capable of tracking and a hyper-accurate GPS unit.  The TT Voyager was even the official GPS unit for races such as King of the Motos. The update to the Voyager, the Voyager Pro, has been anticipated for several years. But Trail Tech insisted on getting the Voyager Pro right before turning it loose on the world. If the several weeks I’ve spent with two Voyager Pro’s are any indication it’s been worth the wait.

PRODUCT: Voyager Pro GPS Unit
MANUFACTURER: Trail Tech

REVIEWED BY:
Martin Hackworth
Executive Director
Sharetrails.Org/BRC

If you ride motorcycles or ATVs you are doubtless already familiar with Trail Tech and the wide variety of lights, electrical supplies, gauges, navigation units and other aftermarket accessories they design and sell.  Some of you may have used their flagship navigation unit – the Voyager. Despite some limitations the TT Voyager was favored by many riders because of the reams of useful vehicle information it was capable of tracking and a hyper-accurate GPS unit.  The TT Voyager was even the official GPS unit for races such as King of the Motos.

The update to the Voyager, the Voyager Pro, has been anticipated for several years. But Trail Tech insisted on getting the Voyager Pro right before turning it loose on the world. If the several weeks I’ve spent with two Voyager Pro’s are any indication it’s been worth the wait.

The Voyager Pro retains the features that made the Voyager very popular: great GPS antenna and chipset, a display that’s easily readable in any lighting conditions, micro SD card for auxiliary storage and easy upload and download of tracks and waypoints, reams of useful vehicle information from a galaxy of optional sensors - and adds to all of this a touchscreen, basemaps, a very useful buddy-tracker and Bluetooth connectivity with a variety of devices.

The only thing missing in the upgrade is the optional billet cradle that was available to protect the older unit (though we hear that one is on its way). I’ve already bounced my Voyager Pro around enough to suspect that it’s fine without it (watch this). The Voyager Pro is at least as sturdy and rugged as a normal GPS unit that one might have mounted in the same spot and does not at all appear to me more vulnerable to damage.

The Voyager Pro is larger than the Voyager by a fair amount (nearly 2x) and does take up some cockpit real estate. The flip side of that is that the screen can be read, in the words of a friend, ”By a blind bat.” Any information that you’d want out of the VP can easily be read in any lighting conditions even by someone like me who normally needs reading glasses.

The Voyager Pro is almost infinitely customizable. You can adjust basically every operational parameter and display via the touchscreen or large buttons and easily navigable menus that make intuitive sense.

The buddy tracking feature, which allows one to track other nearby VP users via shortwave radio connection, is particularly useful. This feature does require an external antenna (included in vehicle specific kits) but works extremely well. Line of sight I’ve yet to find the distance that it doesn’t work. In normal riding with terrain obstacles I haven’t had any issues out to several miles.

But the most eagerly anticipated feature of the Voyager Pro is the inclusion of reasonably detailed basemaps – no more tracks and waypoints over a featureless background!

Though each Voyager Pro is available with vehicle specific kits it is possible to move a VP from vehicle to vehicle if you don’t care about information accumulated in the vehicle specific profile and you have a way to power it (though the internal battery life seems to be at least as good as any battery powered GPS). The Voyager Pro could, in many cases, completely replace the stock vehicle speed and distance gauges. Trail Tech has a number of accessories available including an external GPS antenna and a wall charger.

Installation for each of my units took about an hour without using all of the included sensors. I’ve found the GPS-based speed and distance computations to be reliable and accurate without installing the wheel sensor. The only sensors that I use are the radiator fin temperature sensor and the inductive tach sensor (which I use mainly to turn the unit on and off automatically). Figuring out the best way to externally power the unit is about the only wrinkle in the installation process and even that is very easy following the supplied instructions.

All in all I find the TT Voyager Pro to be well worth the $599.95 MSRP. It has, for most applications, the potential to replace a number of other devices in one unit. Sharetrails Premium members can save nearly $60 off the purchase price by using the Trail Tech code on your membership card. Trail Tech is currently taking orders for these to be shipped by the time you read this.

I acquired my two early release Voyager Pros from Trail Tech specifically for evaluation and feedback.

Trail Tech Voyager Pro – MSRP $599.95. Pro’s: very accurate and versatile GPS functionality, basemaps, buddy tracking, easy to read touchscreen, intuitive menus, reams of vehicle information available. Con’s: It acts as its own bikini faring and they are still not widely available. Verdict: You want one.


 

 

 

Check out our latest fund-raiser HERE.